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Ashy-headed Laughingthrush (Endemic bird to Sri Lanka)

The ashy-headed laughingthrush is a rangy bird, 23 centimeters (9 in) in length with a long floppy tail. It is rufous-brown above and deep buff below, with a grey head and white throat. Like other babblers, these are noisy birds, and the characteristic laughing calls are often the best indication that they are present since they are often difficult to see in their preferred habitat.

Ashy-headed Laughingthrush is an endemic resident breeder in Sri Lanka

I manged to photograph this bird in Sinharaja Forest Reserve. One of my favorite shots as I mange to get the isolated bird with a clear background.

Location:  Sinharaja Forest Reserve – Sri Lanka
Name: Ashy-headed Laughingthrush
Endemism: Endemic resident breeder in Sri Lanka
Scientific name : Argya cinereifrons
Conservation status: Vulnerable 

Sinharaja Forest Reserve is a public park and a biodiversity hotspot in Sri Lanka. It is of worldwide essentialness and has been assigned a Biosphere Reserve and World Heritage Site by UNESCO. This Forest covers a degree of a were roughly 11.187 ha. But with the 2019 Gazette Notification increased the size of the protected Sinharaja rainforest area to 36,474.93 hectares.

2019 Gazette Notification increased the size of the protected Sinharaja rainforest area from 11.187 hectares to 36,474.93 hectares

From east to west the length of the woodland is 21 K.M’s. Arranged in the south-west marsh wet zone of Sri Lanka and falling into the Sabaragamuwa and Southern regions, Sinharaja is encircled by Napola Dola, Koskulana Ganga (north), Maha Dola, Gin Ganga (south-west), the Kalukandawa Ela, Kudawa Ganga (west), Beverley Tea Estate and Denuwa Kanda (east). The height of the Sinharaja forest reserve goes from 200m to 1300m. It has a moving territory comprising of a progression of edges and valleys, which accepts an east-west pattern in the northwestern piece of the hold. In different pieces of the forest reserve, the edges and valleys expect to be a north-west/south-east arrangement.

Sinharaja rainforest is additionally home to over 50% of Sri Lanka’s endemic mammals and butterflies, just as numerous insects, reptiles, and rare amphibians

Sinharaja rainforest is the nation’s last viable zone of essential tropical rainforest. Over 60% of the trees are endemic and a significant number of them are identified as rear. Sinharaja Forest reserve consists of endemic untamed wildlife, particularly birds, however, the rainforest is additionally home to over half of Sri Lanka’s endemic types of mammals and butterflies, just as numerous insects, reptiles, and rare amphibians